The BAR Made Boise Home Again

By Randi Walkins

When you find a community that provides you the space to be the person you need to be that day, it’s worth celebrating and supporting.

When Austin and I moved back to Boise after some time away, we knew we would need to rebuild our social circles and support network. But how? Even though we had both lived in Boise several years prior to our departure and return, we knew we’d changed and we wanted to honor those changes. While in graduate school, we had both started running and learned to appreciate the many things it brought to our lives. 

Austin and I taking our love for the BAR to the Austrian Alps.

We had found the Boise Area Runners website and were curious to join, but it wasn’t until Austin committed us to a Saturday morning run that we understood it’s value. After just a couple of events, we were hooked. We were suddenly meeting people that understood this crazy tendency of ours to run and race for fun. We began making friendships and learning about the diversity of backgrounds that were represented in the group. After just a few short months, we started hosting events and welcomed responsibility in the organization.  

Both Austin and I developed a desire to be involved in the BAR leadership team quickly. We benefited from the BAR community with that first group run and wanted to repay our debt. The BAR, being a volunteer run organization, needs committed people to keep its five weekly runs and numerous special events on the calendar. I think it’s fair to say that the BAR, and running, means many things to many people. For us, it helped us call Boise home again, and brought to our lives some transformative relationships that we would have never had otherwise. The BAR gave us the physical and emotional push we needed. Austin and I became better runners and developed friendships that we will treasure for the rest of our lives. 

As many of you know, Austin and I welcomed a baby boy to our family this year. While we will continue to run as a family of three, we have decided to step down from our responsibilities on the BAR leadership team for now. Let me just say, we already miss you all. With this, we ask that you consider volunteering your time in one of the many available leadership positions to keep the Boise Area Runners moving forward.  

What does the BAR bring to your life? Have you considered giving back?

Nominations for the 2020 elections are going on now. Please consider nominating yourself or someone else for a position using this form: ttps://forms.gle/RnmYq5AJs84H3Zfw9. The period for open nominations ends at the conclusion of the General Membership Meeting on Sunday, October 27th at the Boise Co-op at 11AM. We look forward to seeing you there!

The finish, but not the end.

Giving Back Through Leadership

By Beau Seegmiller

As many of you know (because I talk about it incessantly), I will be racing in the Berlin Marathon on Sunday, September 29th. This upcoming event has given me pause to reflect on my journey as a runner and as a competitor in the marathon. Berlin will be my twenty-second marathon. I remember it taking me over a decade to be able to run my first marathon. I also remember that the key for me successfully completing the preparation necessary to finish that first marathon happened because of a running club and the leadership a wonderful set of coaches provided. 

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I suffered from post-concussion syndrome through my early twenties. While in that condition I wasn’t able to run much at all; however, I remember when some of the symptoms (headaches, extreme fatigue, and general body pains) started to recede I began to train and run more intensely. When I could run four miles without any negative effects, I set my sights on a half-marathon. I trained and had a great first half marathon in Logan, Utah. While at the finish area of this small race, I noticed a big to do over a runner who had qualified for a particular marathon (I don’t remember which one). I recall that being the first time I considered running a marathon myself (at the young age of 24). 

I am not sure when I first decided to start training for a marathon, but I do remember buying The Complete Book of Running and following the wisdom and training plans it held. I decided to try the intermediate plan and soon injured my knee. I couldn’t even bend it for a week. A few years passed and I had moved to Shoshone, Idaho when I attempted a second time. I got a little further along that same plan when I suffered from an inexplicable bout of joint inflammation that sidelined me again. A few years later, while back in Logan, Utah for graduate school, I made the attempt again. This time I got to the 16 mile long run and within 10 weeks of the race when hamstring tendonitis put me out. At this point I accepted that I would run for health and well-being. So much so that I started to focus on power lifting and became a gym rat until the itch to run that 26.2 mile race surfaced again in my consciousness.

This time around I thought I needed to find a way to circumnavigate those seemingly inevitable injuries. By 2005 the internet was in place, so I used Google and discovered that coaching and clubs can be invaluable resources to preparing for a race like the marathon. Living in the Phoenix metropolitan area I had an array of choices. I settled on Phoenix Fit which had about a hundred members, five coaches, and a basic training plan that would get me ready for the PF Chang’s Rock and Roll marathon the following January. All for a cool $90 (I even got a shirt)! The club met once a week for Saturday long runs and had informational seminars on various running topics the half hour prior to the run. 

I ran and trained. I discovered that I loved running with people. I hadn’t run with people since high school cross country. The coaches were very informative and so supportive. Yet, those injuries started to come back. This time both knees and my right soleus became inflamed and angry. I thought I was doomed. The difference this time? I was surrounded by people and coaches who had been through these injuries before and knew treatment approaches: icing, stretches, and strength exercises that worked. It wasn’t long before I was running the first few miles of my first marathon way too fast and high on the joy of being in a race I had failed to reach in over a decade. After completing the last 6 miles of hell and in pain I had never experienced before, I relished the feeling of having completed a marathon.  

As I celebrated reaching this lifetime benchmark with my running club in the finish area, my thoughts went back to that first attempt at training for a marathon over ten years earlier. I felt that I was finally home. I had become the person I always wanted to be, the person I actually had been all along, just now in full bloom. I was a runner. 

What was the difference? In one word: community: a community that would not have been possible without the organization and leadership of those in the Phoenix Fit running club. The club was open to everyone and discoverable to strangers like me. Running is interwoven into the very fiber of every aspect of my being. I run to become who I am. Without Phoenix Fit, my journey would have been very different.

Fast forward to my move to the Boise area. First item on my agenda was to find a running group. The BAR was the first group I discovered and the last that I considered (Five group runs a week! Who can beat that?). After a year of involvement, the BAR was in need of new leadership. It was time for me to give back, to pass on the gift I had been given by the Phoenix Fit running club. 

Serving as the president of the BAR for almost four years now has been one of the great joys in my life. As a non-profit organization the BAR depends on volunteer leadership to function and provide the services it does (those five group runs and the like don’t happen on their own). I have been privileged to see the many contributions other BAR members have made in that time. I have also received as much or more than I have given. 

As we begin accepting nominations for the 2020 leadership team in the BAR, I invite you to consider giving back through taking on a leadership role in the BAR. You can nominate yourself (or get a friend to do it) here: https://forms.gle/RnmYq5AJs84H3Zfw9. Consider the different positions and offices where you might fit best. The period for open nominations ends at the conclusion of the General Membership Meeting on Sunday, October 27th.

More importantly, please take a moment and consider what this BAR tribe has meant to you and your running. How can you pay that forward to the next runner? What contributions can you make? 

With that, I sincerely hope to see you out on a run!

Beau

Geovanni Velazquez: Connecting More Deeply Through Running

By Beau Seegmiller

Geovanni Velazquez’s infectious smile and warm handshake is a hallmark feature at the BAR Sunday morning trail run each week. He and his wife Brita joined the BAR shortly after moving to the Treasure Valley a little over a year ago and have made deep connections to those that they run with as well as with each other. He has even found ways to connect more deeply with himself through running.

Geo was not always a runner. “When I lived in Chicago, I was really into cycling–during the summer, that is. It’s really uncomfortable to bike during a Chicago winter. One cold Midwestern March day when Brita and I were sitting around wishing it was spring, we decided to get off our butts and go for a run around our park. It felt so good to move my body despite the cold that I was hooked.” Since that time, they have continued to run and explore the different facets of running. When asked why he runs today, Geo replies, “I run to meet new people, explore the outdoors, and push myself to be my best.”

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Geo enjoying a well deserved treat after a Sunday morning trail run with the Boise Area Runners.

As Geo has continued to run and train he has discovered important life lessons along the way. “I’ve had to learn that it’s okay to just take time for me. In the past I’ve always felt like I needed to be making money or do something to help a family member, but now I’m learning that it’s okay to do something that will just benefit me and be for my own enjoyment.” 

He recalls back to a time earlier this past winter when the first big snow storm hit. “I felt like a little kid running in the snow up 8th street, and it felt like I was flying coming down.” Through many experiences like this, his running has become the treat he looks forward to each week. “Running in the Boise foothills is a special experience for me.  There have been days when I look out at the snowcapped mountains in the distance and feel like I could run forever.” 

Running isn’t always easy or free of obstacles. “I have experienced some intermittent knee pain, but I’m trying to be smart about strength training and foam rolling to combat it. Also, I have a very physical job in sand and gravel. During weeks when the workload is very physical it’s hard for me to run at all.” But, he has successful worked through these roadblocks to keep growing as a runner.

Running tends to spill over into other aspects of our lives (hence the capacity to create connections). In Geo’s words, “Firstly, running has helped me connect more deeply with myself. I’ve become a more thoughtful and mature person as running has become more significant to me. Also, it has brought my wife and I closer together as it is an enjoyable activity that we share.  Lastly, people in the BAR were some of the first people that we became friends with here in Boise. The BAR is a big reason that the Treasure Valley has started to feel like home to us. The Sunday Morning Trail Run is always one of the highlights of my week.”

Running may be the tool someone uses to stay healthy, get fit, or lose those stubborn pounds. But, at some point, every runner discovers something about themselves and those around them through the simple act of running. Geo unearthed this connection with himself, his wife, and his fellow runners through running. Keep it up, Geo!

See you out on a run!

Tina Beans: Running for Connection

By Tina Beans

photo1I am Tina, current BAR treasurer and unlikely hobby runner. As a slow-pace, short-distance, non-racing athlete, I provide more in the way of diversity (and mad check-writing skills) than running experience to the leadership team. But despite approaching the sport a bit differently from most people I meet, I love being part of the ranks of the BAR.

For one thing, being a runner means getting to mingle with other runners, and generally speaking they tend to be awesome, welcoming people– the kind of folks who generously insist that I *am* a runner, even after seeing my best wheezy-rhino-from-Jumanji impression. Folks who will, in the same conversation, be genuinely excited that I added an extra half mile to a slow Saturday run and casually downplay the fact that they broke the sound barrier in mile 24 of their latest marathon. Runners are good people.

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Tina exploring Santa Cruz, CA through running.

Really, of all the running I do, the miles I put in on vacation are probably my favorite. Vacation runs provide a grounding bit of normalcy in the midst of exploring new places and abandoning my daily routine. Being able to get lost in the rhythm of my footfalls, regardless of the setting I find myself in is centering and like bringing a piece of home with me. While they’re not always grand and seldom involve PRs, those runs often wind up being the highlight of my trips. They connect me to locals and take me to some of the most beautiful places.

And the feeling of solidarity when meeting other runners hasn’t been limited to my experiences in Boise, where people just tend to be over-the-top friendly. When I travel, running is a surefire way to plug into the communities I visit. I love finding out about local running haunts, and area runners are always remarkably generous in sharing their favorite routes.

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Tina exploring Oahu, HI through running.


Here’s to getting outside and putting in the miles, however many miles and at whatever pace that may be!